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“ . 243 Win reloading lot ” ( CC BY 2. 0 ) by Drab Makyo Every serious shooter has at least thought about doing it.

Guide to Reloading

Guide to Reloading“ .243 Win reloading lot ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by Drab Makyo Every serious shooter has at least thought about doing it. Reloading, or handloading, is a great way to get the most out of your shooting experience. If you’re into extreme high-accuracy competitive shooting, reloading is a must. If not, you can still tune your cartridge loads to get the greatest possible performance out of your firearm. Reasons to reload Besides greater accuracy, reloading can be a fun and highly educational experience in itself. It can be a life-long pursuit and a great way to pass the time between competitions or hunting seasons. If you have a rare, antique gun for which ammunition is no longer sold, you may have no choice but to reload. There is a huge range of practical reasons to reload. It’s a great way to get around the occasional shortages in manufactured ammunition. Storebought ammo is pretty great these days, but, besides improving accuracy and performance, by reloading you can increase the consistency of your rounds, which can make all the difference in competition shooting. You also get to choose from a wider range of propellants, or powders, and projectiles, or bullets than those that are available in storebought ammo. If you are training a novice shooter who hasn’t yet grown into his or her boots, you can choose to load rounds with a light powder load to reduce recoil. Then, they can graduate to standard loads as they get the hang of things. Conversely, you can push the power of cartridges by reloading ‘hot’ wildcat rounds, but you better know exactly what you’re doing. “ Done! ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by ryochiji There are a lot of safety concerns regarding reloading, it’s not something you do over a couple of beers. First, trying to fire rounds that have been improperly reloaded can cause your barrel to explode, killing you. Besides, there are a lot of safety concerns during the reloading process. A lot of the chemicals involved are corrosive and/or explosive. Use proper protection, like gloves and safety glasses, and keep careful track that you are using the right volumes of the right powders with the correct components for your weapon. If you choose to cast your own lead bullets, you will face a whole new slew of safety considerations regarding ventilation and molten heavy metal. Will you save money on ammo if you reload? That’s a tough question. Most shooters find that they cancel any cost savings from reloading by shooting more. You will have a substantial initial capital outlay to recoup. If you’re going for the greatest possible accuracy, you’ll have extra expenses for better equipment and components. You will also end up spending a lot on experimentation until you find the right loads for your gun. However, if you buy components in bulk, you will end up saving money. How reloading works Each handgun or rifle cartridge has four components: a case a primer propellant a projectile Reloading is simply the process of researching what the best combination of these four components is for your firearm and purposes and putting them together in the safest and most effective way. The case is the component that is most specific to the chamber of your gun. You have choices of manufacturers, but not much else to consider here. The case is also the component that requires the most attention in the reloading process, which we’ll get into below. All handgun and rifle cases have a neck that holds the bullet, an internal chamber for the powder, a primer pocket to hold the primer, and a flash hole through which the primer ignites the powder. Cases are made of brass, just like they were over a hundred years ago. Don’t try to reload military surplus steel or aluminum shells. “ Cleaning out primer pockets ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by ryochiji Primers are about the size and shape of a small pill. They are made of metal and contain a special priming compound. Most primers used today are ‘boxer style,’ and come in two sizes, big and small. It is unrealistic to reload rimfire cartridges like .22LR, which do not have a replaceable primer. Even though cartridge shell technology hasn’t changed much in over a century, propellant, or powder technology has evolved substantially, giving you a huge range of options to choose from. Different powders burn faster or slower and are suited to different types of shooting. It is essential that you choose a suitable powder for your gun and measure out the right amount. This is one of the key steps to ensure safe, effective shooting. “ Bullet goes on top ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by ryochiji Projectiles, or bullets, come in different calibers, or diameters. That means that you don’t go out and buy .30-06 bullets for reloading, but simply .30 bullets that can be used in a .30-06 round or potentially in a .308, depending on the bullet weight. Bullet weight is usually measured in grains. This is where a lot of opportunity for customization comes in. Different shooting applications require different bullet weights, so you’ll have to do your research. It’s all part of the fun. Besides, there is a huge variety of bullet designs to choose from. A lot of it has to do with terminal ballistics, meaning, what happens when the bullet hits its target. For example, to kill an animal, you want a bullet that will expand and immediately dump a large amount of energy, mortally wounding the animal and hopefully immediately knocking it down. Reloading equipment There is a huge range of equipment that you need for reloading, or that will at least make the process much easier. The most vital equipment is the reloading press, dies, and shell holder. A reloading press clamps to a workbench and has a long lever you pull to operate it. With each pull, a shell, sitting in a shell holder, is forced into a die, which performs one of several stages of the reloading process, which we’ll cover below. There are two main types of reloading press today, single-stage and progressive. A single-stage press is best for beginners because it helps you keep track of each step of the process. With a single-stage, you will load shells in small batches of 20-30 at a time. After one step is complete for the batch, you swap out the die and do the next stage. A turret press is a type of single-stage press that makes swapping dies as easy as a twist of the wrist. All the dies are mounted on a rotating structure which you turn to move to the next reloading stage. With a progressive press , you can do the complete reloading process for each shell sequentially. You put the shell in the shell holder, pull the lever, then rotate a structure holding the shell holder so that the shell will be placed under the next die. Before pulling the lever, put another shell in the first position so that it will go through the first step while the original shell goes through the second as you pull the lever. It’s much more of an assembly line. Once you get started you’ll have a shell in play at all four stages with each pull of the lever. Then, with every pull, a completed shell will drop out. Progressive presses are a lot more expensive than single-stages. Check out our guide to the best single-stage , turret, and progressive reloading presses. If you’re looking for the best one for a beginner reloader, check here . If you demand the utmost precision, check out some of these presses . The shell holder and dies are designed for the specific caliber that you are reloading. You can buy different sets for the same press. Generally speaking, each set of dies includes: a resizing and decapping die a bullet seating and crimping die maybe a neck expanding die for straight-walled cases, to help seat the projectile Here are our reviews of the best reloading dies . Presses can have a powder meter stage before bullet seating which attaches like a normal die and deposits the correct amount of powder into the case. Check out the best powder meters here. “ Throwing a charge of powder ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by ryochiji Resizing is necessary because used shells expand in the chamber. They must be returned to their initial shape before being reloaded. Bullet seating means installing the bullet in the neck of the case. Crimping means tightening the neck to the bullet, protecting the powder, and increasing the pressure upon ignition. You will need to use tiny amounts of die lubricant on your cases. Before getting busy on the press, you will have to prepare your brass. The first step is cleaning them. For that you will use a brass tumbler . You can choose a rotating filled with liquid cleaning chemicals or a vibrating tumbler filled with abrasive media made of walnut shells or corn cob. Both work fine. Ultrasonic tumblers are a more space-age option. We’ve reviewed the best brass tumblers to help you choose. As noted, cases must be resized to a slightly shorter diameter. Over time, re-shot shells will increase in length too. You will need to cut the neck back to the correct length. For that you will need a case trimmer , which is often like a hand-held lathe. Calipers can come in handy to guarantee uniformity in length. Then you’ll use a chamfer to smooth the hard edge you just cut. If you have really shot a given shell many times, you may even want to use a case annealer to restore its structural integrity. Here’s a look at the best case trimmers out there. Then, you have to make sure that the primer pocket and flash hole are clean and smooth. For that, you’ll need handheld primer pocket cleaning and uniforming tools . If a priming stage isn’t set up on your press, you’ll probably use a handheld priming tool to insert the primer into the base of the case. “ Priming ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by ryochiji A good scale is essential for reloading. Ideally, you want to make sure all of your components are uniform in weight. This is crucial for the powder load. You can use a powder trickler to fine-tune the amount of powder that you are loading. Here are our picks for the best powder scales and powder tricklers . A headspace gauge can help you determine the perfect bullet seating depth. Finally, a bullet puller lets you take cartridges apart. This can help you reuse components or correct any reloading mistakes. The reloading process “ Seat the bullet ” ( CC BY 2.0 ) by ryochiji You can get a pretty good idea of the reloading process from the equipment descriptions above, but here it is all laid out. The first step is to research and consult reloading manuals to determine the best load for your intended purpose. If your empty cases are not new, clean them in a vibrating, rotating, or ultrasonic case cleaner. Then, ensure that all the cases are free from any cracks or defects. Consider annealing them if their structural integrity is at all suspect. If you are not using carbide dies, lubricate every 5th or 6th case with a tiny amount of lube. Resize the cases using the appropriate die on the press. The spent primer will usually be removed at the same time. Measure and trim the length of your cases as necessary. Deburr and chamfer the lip of the cases. Resize the neck with the appropriate die. Use your primer pocket cleaning and uniforming tools and flash hole cleaner to prepare the shell for a new primer. Seat a new primer into each case until it is flush with the base of the case. Add the correct amount of powder, possibly from a powder measure attached to your progressive press. Ensure absolute accuracy in the type and quantity of powder loaded. Seat and crimp the bullet into the shell using your press. Finally, Inspect your finished product. Reloading safety Here are some important rules for safe reloading. Remember, you could kill yourself or others if you are not careful . This is not an exhaustive list. You are responsible for taking all necessary precautions. Store powder in a cool, dry, safe location. Do not use the wrong kind of powder. Be especially careful not to confuse modern smokeless powder with black powder. Never smoke anywhere near powder. Discard any unlabelled or potentially mislabeled powder. Follow the recommendations you find in reloading manuals to the letter. Do not substitute with components, especially powder and projectiles, that have not been recommended. Start with the minimum recommended powder load. If unsure of the minimum load, start at load 15% lower than the maximum load. Inspect each shot for excess pressure before continuing to shoot. Do not exceed maximum or minimum loads. Check each case visually to avoid double powder loads. This is a common mistake and it can kill you. Any time you change a reloading component, pressure levels will change, so you will have to start developing your load from square one again. Even different lots of product from the same manufacturer can cause a significant difference. If a few hundred primers go off together, the impact will be equal to a hand grenade. Do not store them together in bulk. Discard unlabeled primers. Follow bullet seating and overall length recommendations carefully. They can have a huge impact on pressure levels. Keep your reloading area tidy, organized, and clean. Immediately clean up spilled powder or primers Read the instructions that came with your reloading equipment and contact the manufacturer with any questions. Only reload in a sober, alert, undistracted, and well-rested state of mind. Conclusion Reloading can be lots of fun as long as you respect the safety precautions necessary. It is a skill that every accomplished shooter should have. Check out our guides on some of the best reloading equipment that money can buy. Stay safe, do your research, hit the range as often as you can, and have fun! Check out our other other great guides on reloading equipment The Six Best Case Prep Centers in 2020 The Best Reloading Benches in 2020 The 6 Best 308 Reloading Dies in 2020 The 8 Best Reloading Dies for 6.5 Creedmoor The 8 Best Reloading Manuals In 2020 The 5 Best Types of Unfired Reloading Brass that Money Can Buy

Venison Too Tough? Heres How to Cook Venison

Venison Too Tough? Heres How to Cook Venison

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d9c45af8_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d9c45af8_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Venison Tips: How to Cook Venison Correctly Tough and gamey venison hasn’t been prepared properly. Here’s how to cook venison so it isn’t tough and gamey. Hint: It starts with aging. I often hear people say that venison is “tough and has a gamey taste.” I have to admit that the first half of my life, I thought the same way. I had only eaten venison once at a wild game supper and it was pretty horrible to say the least. Then I met Scott. My life and dining habits from then on would be drastically different. He always kept our freezer full of wild game and as my sons came along, we have had to buy more freezers to keep up with the amount of venison harvested each year. I have loved living off of the harvested venison and enjoy the exceptional depth of flavor that it offers, not to mention not having to buy meat at the supermarket. How to Cook Venison: Why is Venison Tough and Gamey? There are a few reasons for the tough texture and gamey taste of venison. Deer, unlike domesticated cattle, have to rely on the vegetation in the wild for survival and on average are older when harvested. They are lean from their diet and exercise, therefore do not have the marbling of fat that beef contains. Related GunDigest Articles How to Hunt Deer for Self-Sufficiency Delicious and Easy Venison Chili Recipe 5 Reasons to Butcher Deer Yourself Although this makes the deer healthier, it also can cause the meat to be tough if it is not prepared by someone who knows how to cook venison correctly. The deer’s diet, along with improper aging, will cause venison to taste gamey. Venison does have a distinct flavor, just as grass-fed beef has a distinct flavor, and this must not be confused with gaminess. Most domestic raised animals are bred to be tasteless and fatty. Venison has much more depth of flavor than beef. If venison preparation is done by someone who knows how to cook venison, it will be incredibly and delectably tender. Want the World's Best Venison Jerky Recipe ? Look No Further. How to Cook Venison: It Starts with Aging If a walk-in cooler is not available, it is best to quickly process your venison, then allow the meat to age in the refrigerator on a rack, not allowing it to sit in its blood, for five to seven days.

LooseRounds Reviews the Steyr AUG

LooseRounds Reviews the Steyr AUG

A weapon on my bucket list that I won’t likely ever own… But I want it. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website

Handgun Review: Few Objections Over Custom Taurus Judge

Handgun Review: Few Objections Over Custom Taurus Judge

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cf5dad48_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cf5dad48_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Taurus Judge decked out with the Aimpro Tactical's custom treatment. Aimpro Tactical makes a unique handgun even more unique, customizing the Taurus Judge to feed smoother and look sharper. When the Taurus Judge first popped on the scene sometime around 2007, the big bore wheelgun, capable of firing virtually every .45-caliber round ever developed as well as .410 shotgun shells, was regaled for its novelty more so than respected for its true intention: to create one bad ass defensive handgun. But regardless of what drove the initial interest in the Judge, the interest was indeed there, and has continued so that Taurus continues to add configurations to the line (there are now at least a dozen models of the Judge) that continues to garner plenty of fans—no small feat in this age of semi-auto handgunning. Thus it is no surprise that when Taurus approached Aimpro Tactical’s Mike Shain about teaming up to develop a line of customized Taurus handguns, among the first models worked on was a Judge. For the one pictured here, Shain started with a standard Model 4510TKR-3B Judge with a 3-inch barrel, blued finish and 2 ½-inch chambering for either .410 or .45 Long Colt rounds. The revolver’s overall length is a compact 7 ½ inches for such a big bore gun and tips the scales at a mere 29 ounces. As standard, the model comes with fixed sights, including a fiber optic front sight. “The Judge is such a cool handgun and has become so popular because shooters can mix and match the ammo. Some manufacturers are even making special rounds just for the Judge,” says Mike Shain, owner of Aimpro Tactical (aimprotactical.com) in Colorado. The company opened in 1995 primarily as a training and consulting business with Shain using his background in law enforcement as the driver. They soon moved into customizing and building special tactical Mossberg shotguns. Related GunDigest Articles AK-47 Review: Krebs Custom KV-13 Handgun Review: New Ithaca 1911 Handgun Review: Sphinx SDP Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! “I’ve been wanting to expand into the pistol and revolver area and the planets have finally lined up for us,” says Shain. With the Judge, Aimpro Tactical applied its performance package to the traditional double-action revolver offering. First, they break the entire gun down and polish up and fine tune the double-action operation to make it as smooth as possible. The forcing cone on the barrel is recut to 11 degrees and the barrel is chamfered to 45 degrees. By chamfering the charging hole or chamber of the cylinder so that it blends better with the ejector star, loads feed much more easily, and quickly, especially when speed loading. “It’s like reworking the magazine well of a semi-auto gun so it feeds better,” says Shain. The gun is then lubricated and functioned checked. As for the exterior of the Judge, Aimpro Tactical smooths out any hard edges on the gun, improving it for carry purposes and making it easier to draw. Applying a true custom flare, they also polish out the hammer and trigger and jewel them. Custom Taurus Judge, fine tuned to cycle smoother. “When I grew up jewelling was the ultimate custom feature you could do to show a gun is high-end,” says Shain. “People just twinkle at the sight at a couple of jeweled parts on their gun.” This Judge is then refinished in Xtreme-Coat, an ultra-thin moly-based coating that resists corrosion and makes the revolver even more durable than in its standard finish. The coat resists wear from use and provides a flat, nonreflective finish favorable among the tactically minded shooters of today. The frame of the gun is finished in mil-spec OD Green, while the cylinder on this model is completed in matte black. The Hogue grips on this initial Judge are black as well, though buyers also have the option of getting Hogue grips in matching OD Green as well. As for the sights, the gun boasts a fiber optic front sight on it now with the standard red replaced with a green to better match the gun. Shain is currently working on designing a new sight for future models that will include a yellow fiber optic front sight to match flat dark earth finished guns, as well as options of brass, tritium or white.

Watch: The Grand Power P11: Full-size Features in a Carry Gun

The Grand Power XCalibur stunned me. From the first shot it was so smooth and easy to point that it didn’t feel like shooting. The sensation was closer to pointing a magic long-range hole puncher at paper. Squeeze the trigger and after a loud noise a hole appears exactly where you were pointing. Truly ambidextrous controls, a rotating barrel that reduces felt recoil, and some of the finest machining I’ve ever encountered. I couldn’t afford to buy one, but did anyways. So began my love for the Grand Power line of pistols. Clean machining and a steel chassis keep the trigger crisp. Built in an ISO 9001 compliant factory with 4 and 5 axis CNC machines shaping parts to within +/-.005mm (that’s 0.000196″!). For reference that’s about 1/10 the thickness of a standard sheet of paper! If you grew up with Common Core math, we’ll summarize with this: it’s accurate. When a gun is made of 53 parts machined with that level of accuracy one might expect some accuracy out of the gun. Accurate is an understatement in this case. As an experienced and trained shooter, I consider my ability above average, but by no means Miculek level. "The Grand Power" ’s transfer some of their namesake into any shooter’s abilities as demonstrated by a grouping of 15 rounds at seven yards fired in short succession. Graham’s 15-shot group at seven yards So when I had a chance to try a compact carry model you might understand my excitement. Grand Power P11 XCalibur Caliber 9 MM 9 MM Action DA/SA DA/SA Capacity 12+1 15+1 Barrel Length 3.3″ 5″ Front Sight Plastic Fiber Optic Rear Sight Drift Adjustable Steel Micrometer Adjustable Steel Finish Black Black Grips Polymer Polymer Construction Steel Slide, Steel Frame, Polymer Grip Steel Slide, Steel Frame, Polymer Grip Safety Frame-Mounted Thumb Safety/Decocker Frame- "Mounted Thumb Safety" Weight 22.6oz 28.1oz Length 7″ 8.7″ Height 4.6″ 5.3″ Width 1.4″ 1.4″ Grand Power P11 Tabletop View Enter the Grand Power P11. With the same precision, rotating barrel, and feel as the competition-oriented XCalibur, but in a more concealable size. Typically, with carry guns the reduction in size also means a reduction in features. With the P11 we lose the interchangeable back straps from the XCalibur, but gain a true double-action, single-action capability. Condition 1 with the hammer back and safety on. Condition 2 with the hammer safely lowered, safety off. Condition 2.5? Leaving the decocker down keeps the gun in double-action only mode. The ability to not only decock the firearm, but also leave it in double-action only helps the user train themselves with the heavier and longer pull of that first shot if you prefer to carry in condition 2. A rotating barrel is uncommon in most handguns as they typically keep with the browning design. At first glance one might think that Grand Power’s method is similar to Beretta’s, but in fact it is not and is their own patented design. With a rotating barrel, there is no need for the barrel to shift vertically. This permits the barrel to be lower and closer vertically to the hand. As a result, there is less shift in weight during the cycling of the gun and what weight does shift transfers more through the shooter’s hand than over it. To the shooter this equals less perceived recoil. Without the clunking locking blocks of Browning’s design the pistol also cycles smoother which results in less muzzle flip. Range Time with the Grand Power P11 In the end the P11 provides most of the shooting enjoyment of the XCalibur with all of the precision machining and quality that we’ve come to expect from Grand Power.

.300 Winchester Mag [Caliber]: Best Ammo & Rifles

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you are looking for a cartridge that will cover your hunting needs from Alaska to Zimbabwe, look no further than the .300 Winchester Magnum. Since 1963 hunters, target shooters, snipers, and law enforcement personnel have depended on Winchester’s Big 30 to deliver results. Fire up your computer and search for “best long-range hunting cartridge” or “best all-around magnum cartridge” and you’ll be sure to find the .300 Win Mag in the top 10 of every list you find. Image source: GunWerks And for good reason. The .300 delivers accuracy, terminal performance and consistent results in rifles built on standard length actions. Simply put, you can load a whole lot of performance in an action the same length as your 30-06. Once you’re done here, you’ll know exactly how the .300 Win Mag came to be, what role it fills, and what our top recommendations are for hunting and long-range ammo, and even some of our favorite rifles to shoot them in. Table of Contents Loading... History The . "300 Winchester Magnum" came along in 1963, quite a bit later than the 300 Weatherby which was introduced in 1944 and the 308 Norma Magnum which showed up around 1960. Winchester took their 338 Win Mag case and bumped the shoulder forward a bit and lengthened the case a bit to develop the 300. If we reach back even further we find that the lineage of this great cartridge can be traced to the 375 H&H Magnum . The case was simply blown out to have less taper, shortened and necked down to accept the 30 caliber bullet. So why has the 300 Win Mag outlasted and outshined other great 30 caliber magnums like the "308 Norma Magnum" and the 300 H&H Magnum? Well, a great cartridge requires a great rifle – Winchester’s Model 70 fit that role . A Winchester Model 70 in 375 H&H…No other rifle has captured the hearts of hunters the way the Model 70 has The rifle had already gained a loyal following and the 300 Win Mag offered a level of performance not seen in other Winchester rifles. Other manufacturers followed suit and built rifles to house the Big 30. Though we see lots of 300 Weatherby’s, the huge 30-378 Weatherby and the 300 Remington Ultra Mag, none can be chambered in a compact standard length action. With the 30 calibers being the most popular in North America, there are a wide variety of bullet types and weights available in factory loaded ammo and even more choices available to the handloader. Left to Right .308 Winchester, 30-06 Springfield, .338 Winchester Magnum, .300 Winchester Magnum, .375 H&H Magnum A quick look at the Hornady catalog reveals 19 different factory-loaded options with bullets ranging from 150 grains to 200 grains. Likewise, Hornady supplies the handloader with 30 caliber bullets from 110 grains to 225 grains and data for each in the Tenth Edition reloading manual. Federal catalogs 18 factory options with bullets weighing 150 to 200 grains. The Nosler Reloading Guide Number Four lists handload data for bullets ranging from 125 grains to 220 grains. As you can see, with the wide variety of bullets and loads available, the 300 Win Mag can literally do and be anything you want. Who Needs a .300 Win Mag? The popularity of the 300 Win Mag has been driven mostly by hunters. Those who pursue big game such as elk, moose and large African plains game are well-served with the power the 300 delivers. When you are planning on hunting big game, most often there is a fairly big price tag attached that includes not only dollars but your time as well. The 300 Win Mag is perfect for hunting big elk You want a rifle and cartridge that can be counted on to make that shot of a lifetime on a big elk or trophy kudu. For the most part, big game is taken at fairly close range. However, when that six-point bull gives you a brief look on the last day of a mountain hunt and he’s 450 yards away at the edge of a meadow, having a 300 Win Mag in hand helps even the playing field a bit. What you’re carrying could be the difference in going home with a freezer full of meat and a set of trophy antlers or having to pass on the shot. Your 30-06 can make the shot, but the 300 Win Mag offers over 400 foot-pounds more energy with a 180-grain bullet at that 400-yard plus bull elk. I’d rather have more energy than less. This Montana bull was taken late in the hunt…the shot was 510 yards with a .300 Win Mag .300 Win Mag Bullets and Performance The 180-grain bullet is probably the go-to for most big game hunting. It offers a nice balance of velocity and power. With today’s choices in bullet construction something like a 180 grain Hornady GMX gives you a monolithic bullet with a BC (ballistic coefficient) of .485. The higher the BC, the better the bullet overcomes the environment it is flying through. In short, you have less drop and wind deflection at a given yardage than a bullet with a lower BC. With 165-grain bullets, you can start them at around 3000-3100 feet per second. If you are hunting sheep or coues whitetail where shots are often long and the game is not all that difficult to kill with well-placed shots, the 165 gives you a bit of an edge with regards to a “flatter” trajectory. 300 Win Mag Bullets What do you think of the .300 Win Mag so far? Readers' Ratings 4.96/5 (660) Your Rating? Long-Range Shooting Let’s step out of the hunting world and into the realm of long-range shooting. I do not advocate taking game at extreme ranges unless you have the rifle platform, optics and range time to consistently make first round hits with hunting-style bullets at your maximum effective range. That means lots of range time and lots of trigger time. Just because you can bang steel at 1000 yards from a bench or prone, doesn’t mean you should be shooting at game animals at that range. That being said, the 300 Win Mag shines as a long-range cartridge. With the high-BC heavy bullets available today, making hits at far away targets is possible. Shooting Long Range Take something like a Hornady 208 grain ELD-Match with a BC of .670. That aerodynamic bullet and heavyweight allow the bullet to achieve a very flat trajectory. Starting at 2800 feet per second you will see only a 49-inch drop over 500 yards with 2148 foot-pounds of energy. Your drop will be 470 inches at 1200 yards and you will have 939-foot-pounds of energy. Now compare that to your 180-grain hunting bullet. At 500 yards you will be 49 inches low and have 1625 foot pounds of energy left, but at 1200 yards you are now 560 inches low and at 530 foot pounds. More long range shooting…frosty Hopefully, this helps illustrate the power of BC and what big, heavy bullets can do for the long-range shooter. In 2009 the U.S. government purchased match grade ammunition for use in its M24 Sniper Weapon System. The load consists of 220 grain Sierra MatchKing Hollow Point Boat Tail Very Low Drag bullets fired at 2850 feet per second. With this load, the 300 Win Mag becomes effective for military engagement out to 1500 yards. That’s just 260 yards short of a mile! Factory Ammo For Your 300 Win Mag We’ve looked at performance in the hunting field and at the target range.  There is no doubt the 300 Win Mag can accel in both arenas. But what kind of ammo should you be looking for to feed your 300? Let’s begin by looking at some solid choices for hunting big game.  As mentioned above, I believe the round is best suited to 180-grain bullets for big game. You have a great balance of aerodynamic performance and terminal energy on your intended target.  Here are some solid choices for your hunting needs. Best .300 Win Mag Hunting Ammo Hornady 180gr GMX Superformance Best .300 Win "Mag Hunting Ammo" 300 Win Mag - 180gr GMX - Hornady Superformance 36 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 36 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing A great choice with a 1-piece copper bullet that boasts 100-200 fps more velocity using specially blended powders and 95% weight retention. Hornady 180gr Interbond Superformance Hornady 180gr Superformance Interbond 40 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 40 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The Interbond is a solid lead core bonded to a heavy copper jacket that expands evenly and stays together for deep penetration in the toughest big game. Nosler Trophy Grade 180gr Accubond 300 Win Mag - 180gr Accubond Nosler Custom Trophy Grade 58 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 58 at Cabelas Compare prices (3 found) Cabelas (See Price) LuckyGunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The Nosler Accubond bullet is lead-core bullet bonded to a copper jacket to eliminate any separation.  With a boat-tail and a polymer tip the Accubond is a great combination of accuracy and terminal performance. Best .300 Win Mag Long Range Shooting Ammo Hornady 195 Grain ELD Match These are Extremely Low Drag bullets meant exclusively for long-range shooting.  They are not designed for game killing expansion so should not be used as such. Hornady 300 Win Mag 195gr ELD-M 45 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 45 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing These bullets also feature a Heat Shield tip to decrease bullet nose deformity as the bullet moves through the air.  This is the type of bullet you want when steel plates are on the menu. Federal Gold Medal Match – 190 Grain Sierra MatchKing The Sierra MatchKing bullets are known for record-setting accuracy.  The Federal load with a 190 grain Boat Tail Hollow Point is meant as a target shooting round. Best Long-Range .300 Win Mag Federal 300 Win Mag 190gr "Gold Medal Match" HPBT 47 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 47 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing If you want to squeeze all the accuracy you can out of your 300 Win Mag, give the MatchKing a try. This is by no means an exhaustive list of factory-loaded ammo available.  Like the number of guns in the Cabela’s catalog, the choices of available 300 Win Mag ammo at Brownells numbers over 50.  With a modern rifle and optics, you are sure to find a factory load that your rifle favors for hunting or long-range shooting. Recommended .300 Win Mag Rifles Like I’ve said before, there is no better time than now for the shooter. There are so many great guns at every price-point that you should be able to find a 300 Win Mag that suits you. Checking in over at Cabela’s the 300 Win Mag has 50 listings in the catalog. That speaks to the popularity of this fine cartridge. You will find entry level guns like the Remington Model 783 with scope combo that can get you hunting for as little as $339. Remington Model 783 with 3-9x Scope Combo 340 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 340 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing Or you can step up, get out the checkbook and get yourself a Seekins Precision Havak for $2,900. Will the Seekins shoot better than the Model 783? Who’s to say. Find the rifle that fits your needs and your budget and hit the range! Final Thoughts Hopefully, you’ve learned a little about the grand .300 Winchester Magnum. The only real downside to the cartridge is its voracious appetite for powder. For a normal 180-grain hunting load you’ll be burning about 70 grains of powder as compared to the 55 grains you light off in your 30-06. And with powder consumption comes recoil. You will experience about 30% more recoil than your 30-06 delivers. Some folks with this level of recoil preclude accurate shooting. Some of the shoulder bashings can be mitigated with a good brake. If I was going to put together a 300 Winchester Magnum for hunting I’d look very seriously at the Tikka T3x . It comes in at 6.5 pounds and with a scope and brake installed would be around 7.5 pounds which makes for a very handy mountain rifle. Best Do-It-All Bolt-Action Tikka T3X Lite 590 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 590 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing I know my Tikka in 308 Winchester will shoot sub-MOA groups all day long and I wouldn’t expect any less of the rifles in 300 Win Mag. While we don’t have a full review on the Tikka T3x Lite right now, one will be coming very soon! Sneek preview though, we love it. But, be sure to double up on your hearing protection, because a braked .300 Win Mag is loud, especially to anyone on the range beside you. Tell us in the comments about your experience with the .300 Winchester Magnum and what loads have worked for you! Also, taken any big game with it? Check out our Editor’s Picks for our favorite other rifles and gear.

Summary

“ . 243 Win reloading lot ” ( CC BY 2. 0 ) by Drab Makyo Every serious shooter has at least thought about doing it.